Discussion:
STILL Won't Lower Electric Bills and Teslas Will Always Be "Second Cars", Going On Short Jaunts, Until Nationwide Charging Stations Are a Thing
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AlleyCat
2022-01-03 05:22:24 UTC
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Permalink
Six Problems With Electric Cars That Nobody STILL Talks About

On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 11:29:52 -0600, Unum says...
A fluffy opinion piece from 2016, lol.
LOL... said the one who posts OUT-OF-DATE articles that ARE obsolete.

MY article still holds true.

Can you take an EV camping? Maybe across town in tha projects. THAT would be
exciting for your lily-white pansy-ass.

Sure blows that "I drive EVs ONLY" bullshit theory of Kymberly's. The ONLY
people who drive ONLY EVs, are shut-in Californians who never GO anywhere,
anyways, for fear of being shit on by some meth-head.

EVs are NOT taking the place of ICE vehicles. You and I will be lonnnnng gone
and the Earth will be OUT of fossil fuels before that happens.

Can the British take the Chunnel and explore Europe? Probably not.

Sure, England can drive around England... they live on a postage stamp, but
surrounded by water.

What about China, Russia... US? Uhhhh... no.

Can YOU work on an EV? Can YOU jump-start one. No, that's the ashtray, you
dork.

=====

You sure you wanna be cavortin' with Rudy, Unum? After all, he's not really
your type.

Even if you're not gay... he HAS to be enraging your left-wing, compassionate
liberal sensibilities.

Examples:

Rudy's Little Man's Disease: A disease of short males marked by aggressive
antisocial behavior and constant overcompensation resulting in pompous
mannerisms such as spitting, twitching, swearing, speaking loudly and tough
talk.

**FAGGOT!** - Rudy Canoza

"Fixed your lie, you you no-fight faggot." - Rudy Canoza

"Thanks for kicking my faggot ass." - Rudy Canoza

"'Self' is redundant, you toothless squat-to-piss no-fight faggot. - Rudy
Canoza

"I've beaten *you* to a bloody pulp, you squat-to-piss *no-fight* faggot -
every fucking time. You're a zero, as every, stale, squat-to-piss *no-fight*
faggot who incessantly bleats about "mommy's basement" *ALWAYS* is." - Rudy

"... you you no-fight faggot." - Rudy

"... you toothless squat-to-piss no-fight faggot" - Rudy

"Kicked your flabby faggot ass again. Yes." - Rudy

"You a Squat-to-Piss Faggot." - Rudy

"The disgusting gurgling, slurping sounds below are just the faggots Hartung,
Sanitary Napkin and Bit of Nothingness enjoying a three-way" - Rudy

"YOU lose, Nazi faggot." - Rudy

That's our Rudy... a homophobic racist midget.

Little Man's Disease is an untreatable epidemic in this country.

This is Rudy: https://i.imgur.com/quxiPEh.mp4

Now... is someone who talks like that, the cavortin' type for you?

And don't give me that "well, Id rather cavort with him, than you" bullshit. We
don't cavort. You aren't my type neither, fella.

=========================================================================

The Global Average Temperature Dropped 0.29C Last Month - Now Sits At Just
0.08C Above The 30-Year Baseline

School Cancelled In Yakutia, Russia As Temperatures Plunge To -50C (-58F)

Record-Breaking Cold Continues To Grip Western Canada

"Red Alerts" Issued In India As Cold Wave Intensifies

Amid Freezing Lows & Energy Shortages, Europe Struggles To Keep The Lights On

Bhopal, India Suffers Lowest Temp In 55 Years

"Hazardous" Freeze To Hit The Prairies

Rare Polar Stratospheric Clouds Spotted

Europe Forecast A Bitterly Cold and Snowy Christmas

Colder Winter Headed For U.S. With Incoming 'Polar Vortex'

"Unprecedented" Cold Wave Is Hitting Scandinavia

Alaska Suffers "Persistent Record-Shattering Cold"

A Freezing Start To Winter Is "Rapidly Depleting" Europe's Gas Reserves

St. Petersburg's "Deep Freeze" Breaks 1893 Record

Sweden Busts All-Time December Low (-46.8F)

Bethel, Alaska Suffered Its Coldest November in 82 Years

Australia Suffered Coldest Nov Since 1999

Monthly Lows (And Rare Snows) Fall in Hawaii

Record Cold Grips Siberia (-68.3F)

Canada Sees Lowest November Temp Since 2004 (-45.6F)

Low Temperature Records Continue to Fall Across Europe

Australia's NSW Suffers Coldest November On Record

Record Lows Grip Europe

Sweden Registers -37.4C (-35.3F)

UK Schools Forced To Shut, + Bigger Freeze Inbound

Nordic Power Prices Surge On Sub-Zero Temps And Low Winds

Danger To Life' Warning Issued In Scotland

Spain Issues 'Cold Weather Alerts' - Restarts Old Coal Power Plant To Cope

In 2021 (To Date), A Total of 222 All-Time Low Temperature Records Have Been
Broken In The United States, Versus Just The 7 For All-Time High
AlleyCat
2022-01-04 06:44:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://i.imgur.com/vd681er.mp4

================================================

On Mon, 3 Jan 2022 10:26:03 -0600, Unum says...
Tesla Inc. delivered
[giggle]
In a statement Sunday, Tesla said it delivered
[guffaw]
Tesla added that its final delivery numbers
[snicker]

He said "delivered".

This has been explained to you many times, stupid.

=====

https://groups.google.com/g/alt.global-warming/c/IjwuHkR_wMU/m/VIwjGWIYAgAJ

The Tesla Model 3 Was The Best-Selling Luxury Car In America Last Year

On Wed, 13 Feb 2019 15:50:14 -0600, Unum says...
There is a difference.
Not interested in your mindless blabbering.
What a fucking chicken shit pansy. No, you're not interested in the truth,
like all wussified liberals.

How many Teslas were SOLD in 2018, NOT delivered, but sold.

There is a difference.

<CsIA>, other than your mindless hate drivel.

How many Teslas were SOLD TO CONSUMERS in 2018... NOT delivered, but sold?

How many were delivered vs. delivered THEN sold?

<CIA>

"Delivered" cars aren't SOLD cars.

What a lying little pussy.

====

#sad

Pussy thinks that no one knows the difference.

============================================================================

The Global Average Temperature Dropped 0.29C Last Month - Now Sits At Just
0.08C Above The 30-Year Baseline

School Cancelled In Yakutia, Russia As Temperatures Plunge To -50C (-58F)

Record-Breaking Cold Continues To Grip Western Canada

"Red Alerts" Issued In India As Cold Wave Intensifies

Amid Freezing Lows & Energy Shortages, Europe Struggles To Keep The Lights On

Bhopal, India Suffers Lowest Temp In 55 Years

"Hazardous" Freeze To Hit The Prairies

Rare Polar Stratospheric Clouds Spotted

Europe Forecast A Bitterly Cold and Snowy Christmas

Colder Winter Headed For U.S. With Incoming 'Polar Vortex'

"Unprecedented" Cold Wave Is Hitting Scandinavia

Alaska Suffers "Persistent Record-Shattering Cold"

A Freezing Start To Winter Is "Rapidly Depleting" Europe's Gas Reserves

St. Petersburg's "Deep Freeze" Breaks 1893 Record

Sweden Busts All-Time December Low (-46.8F)

Bethel, Alaska Suffered Its Coldest November in 82 Years

Australia Suffered Coldest Nov Since 1999

Monthly Lows (And Rare Snows) Fall in Hawaii

Record Cold Grips Siberia (-68.3F)

Canada Sees Lowest November Temp Since 2004 (-45.6F)

Low Temperature Records Continue to Fall Across Europe

Australia's NSW Suffers Coldest November On Record

Record Lows Grip Europe

Sweden Registers -37.4C (-35.3F)

UK Schools Forced To Shut, + Bigger Freeze Inbound

Nordic Power Prices Surge On Sub-Zero Temps And Low Winds

Danger To Life' Warning Issued In Scotland

Spain Issues 'Cold Weather Alerts' - Restarts Old Coal Power Plant To Cope

In 2021 (To Date), A Total of 222 All-Time Low Temperature Records Have Been
Broken In The United States, Versus Just The 7 For All-Time High
AlleyCat
2022-01-04 06:48:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"(T)hey require roughly eight hours to fully charge longer-range batteries,
longer than anyone wants to wait to charge a vehicle on a road trip."

=====

Automakers Face a Threat to EV Sales: Slow Charging Times

If the auto industry is to succeed in its bet that electric vehicles will soon
dominate the roads, it will need to overcome a big reason why many people are
still avoiding them: fear of running out of juice between Point A and Point B.
By Associated Press | June 7, 2021, at 6:22 p.m.


FILE - In this Thursday, April 22, 2021 file photo, White House climate
adviser Gina McCarthy, left, talks with EVgo Chief Executive Officer Cathy Zoi,
before the start of an event near an EVgo electric car charging station at
Union Station in Washington. If the auto industry is to succeed in its bet that
electric vehicles will soon dominate the roads, it will need to overcome a big
reason why many people are still avoiding them: Fear of running out of juice
between Point A and Point B. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) The Associated Press

By TOM KRISHER, AP Auto Writer

DETROIT (AP) - If the auto industry is to succeed in its bet that electric
vehicles will soon dominate the roads, it will need to overcome a big reason
why many people are still avoiding them: fear of running out of juice between
Point A and Point B.

Automakers have sought to quell those concerns by developing EVs that go
farther per charge and fill up faster. Problem is, most public charging
stations now fill cars much too slowly, requiring hours - not minutes - to
provide enough electricity for an extended trip.

Concerned that such prolonged waits could turn away potential EV buyers and
keep them stuck on gas-burning vehicles, automakers are trying to cut charging
times to something close to the five or 10 minutes of a conventional gasoline
fill-up.

"It's absolutely the target to get faster and faster," said Brett Smith,
technology director at the Center for Automotive Research, an industry think
tank. "It's not there yet, but it's one of those things that moves the needle
more toward a competitive vehicle for a lot of people, this ability to fast
charge."

The latest generation of EVs, many with ranges around 300 miles (480
kilometers) per charge, can accept electricity at a much faster rate than
previous models could. So fast, in fact, that most charging stations cannot yet
accommodate the vehicles' advanced technology.

It can now require hours to fully charge an electric vehicle because most
stations operate on a home-like alternating current. Direct-current fast-
charging stations, by contrast, are hours faster. But they can cost tens of
thousands of dollars more.

The high cost is something the Biden administration will have to consider as it
develops incentives to encourage companies and governments to build 500,000
charging stations nationwide by 2030. Among the possibilities being discussed
are grants, with $15 billion in spending over five years to build the network,
including fast chargers along highways and in communities. Details are being
worked out as the administration negotiates its infrastructure plan with key
members of Congress.

Of the roughly 42,000 public charging stations in the United States, only about
5,000 are considered direct-current fast chargers, according to the Department
of Energy. The rest are like home chargers; they require roughly eight hours to
fully charge longer-range batteries, longer than anyone wants to wait to charge
a vehicle on a road trip.

And most fast chargers can pump out only about 50 kilowatts per hour -
requiring roughly an hour to charge an average EV to 80% - even though newer
EVs are capable of being charged must faster than that.

"It's one of the big barriers for someone who is not living with a battery-
electric vehicle yet," said Alex Tripi, who head's Volvo's electric vehicle
marketing. "It will continue to be for a while."

Limited by technology, early electric vehicles charged at ridiculously low
speeds when compared with recent models. When Nissan's Leaf first went on sale
more than a decade ago, for example, it could take in only 50 kilowatts per
hour from a fast charger. That meant it took a half hour to charge it to 80% of
its small battery, with a range of just 58 miles (93 kilometers).

A new long-range version released in 2019 nearly tripled the range per charge.
Because it can take 100 kilowatts at a fast charger, it can get to 80% - 181
miles (291 kilometers) - in 45 minutes.

Newer EVs can be charged even faster. But they far exceed the capacity of most
fast chargers. Ford's Mustang Mach-E and F-150 Lightning can take in 150
kilowatts per hour. Hyundai's Ioniq 5 and Porsche's Taycan are over 200
kilowatts.

The Hyundai, with 300 miles (480 kilometers) of range, can go from a 10% charge
to 80% in just 18 minutes, much closer to gasoline fill-up times. (Automakers
tend to quote charging times to 80% of battery capacity because it takes much
longer to go from 80% to 100%; the final 20% is often slowed down to prolong
battery life.) Hyundai knows there aren't many chargers now that can fill the
Ioniq that fast. But it says it's ready for a future when more quick chargers
are more widely available.

"Hopefully the infrastructure will improve across the U.S. for this to be a
whole lot more viable," said John Shon, senior group manager of product
planning.

Tesla, which has its own private charging network of 25,000 plugs worldwide,
leads just about every automaker. Its newer chargers can crank out up to 250
kilowatts and 175 miles (282 kilometers) of range in about 15 minutes.

Electrify America, a charging network funded with money paid by Volkswagen as
punishment for its emissions cheating scandal, says it's ready for the newer
EVs. Having installed fast chargers since 2018, it runs more than 600 stations
with 2,600 plugs nationwide. All can pump out 150 kilowatts. That means they
can charge a typical EV with 300 miles (480 kilometers) of range to 80 percent
of battery capacity (240 miles (386 kilometers) ) in roughly 45 minutes. Over
half of Electrify America's stations can pump out 350 kilowatts, which charge
twice as fast.

A fast-charge fill-up to 80% of battery capacity varies by state but typically
costs around $16.

Even Tesla owners, who can access the nation's biggest fast-charging charging
network, risk running out of juice on road trips, especially in rural areas. On
Monday, one such driver, Dan Nelson, said he had to stop at a Tesla station
near Ann Arbor, Michigan, for more than 20 minutes to make sure his Model 3 had
enough charge to reach his rural home 25 miles (40 kilometers) away.

"There's definitely improvements that can be made," said Nelson, who charges at
home most of the time.

Bruce Westlake, president of the East Michigan Electric Auto Association,
suggested that such anxiety tends to ease as people gain more experience with
EVs. He said he is now comfortable running his two Teslas as low as 5% of
battery capacity to go farther between charges on trips.

Research by J.D. Power shows that most people think charging stations are
needed at locations where gas stations are now. But in fact, according to the
Energy Department, most EV owners charge at home more than 80% of the time.

That means super-fast chargers, which can cost close to $100,000, should be
built mainly along highways where people are traveling long distances and need
to charge quickly, experts say. They also may be needed in urban areas where
people live in apartments with no access to a home charger.

It's far from clear that the automakers can depend on a proliferation of fast
chargers across the country to build customer confidence and propel EV sales in
the years ahead. The high cost and heavy load on utility grids likely will
limit the number of fast chargers to areas where they're needed for quick fill-
ups, said Jessika Trancik, an associate professor at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology who studies EV charging.

"As we're approaching this transition," she said, "it's important to be more
strategic than just putting them everywhere."

Charging companies have time to figure out where to build fast chargers,
because it would take more than 17 years to convert the entire U.S. fleet of
279 million passenger vehicles from petroleum to electricity - even if every
motorist were willing to make the switch, said Pasquale Romano, CEO of
ChargePoint, a charging station company. But the chargers can't come fast
enough for automakers, who want more people to buy their EVs to spread
development costs over more vehicles.

Romano says fast chargers will be needed about every 75 miles (120 kilometers)
on roads that connect metro areas, and that the United States should get there
in about two years. As more EVs are sold, he said, more stations will be built.

"You don't want to put all the infrastructure in for 20 years starting with
vehicle zero," Romano said. "This is about the natural organic growth."

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not
be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


============================================================================

The Global Average Temperature Dropped 0.29C Last Month - Now Sits At Just
0.08C Above The 30-Year Baseline

School Cancelled In Yakutia, Russia As Temperatures Plunge To -50C (-58F)

Record-Breaking Cold Continues To Grip Western Canada

"Red Alerts" Issued In India As Cold Wave Intensifies

Amid Freezing Lows & Energy Shortages, Europe Struggles To Keep The Lights On

Bhopal, India Suffers Lowest Temp In 55 Years

"Hazardous" Freeze To Hit The Prairies

Rare Polar Stratospheric Clouds Spotted

Europe Forecast A Bitterly Cold and Snowy Christmas

Colder Winter Headed For U.S. With Incoming 'Polar Vortex'

"Unprecedented" Cold Wave Is Hitting Scandinavia

Alaska Suffers "Persistent Record-Shattering Cold"

A Freezing Start To Winter Is "Rapidly Depleting" Europe's Gas Reserves

St. Petersburg's "Deep Freeze" Breaks 1893 Record

Sweden Busts All-Time December Low (-46.8F)

Bethel, Alaska Suffered Its Coldest November in 82 Years

Australia Suffered Coldest Nov Since 1999

Monthly Lows (And Rare Snows) Fall in Hawaii

Record Cold Grips Siberia (-68.3F)

Canada Sees Lowest November Temp Since 2004 (-45.6F)

Low Temperature Records Continue to Fall Across Europe

Australia's NSW Suffers Coldest November On Record

Record Lows Grip Europe

Sweden Registers -37.4C (-35.3F)

UK Schools Forced To Shut, + Bigger Freeze Inbound

Nordic Power Prices Surge On Sub-Zero Temps And Low Winds

Danger To Life' Warning Issued In Scotland

Spain Issues 'Cold Weather Alerts' - Restarts Old Coal Power Plant To Cope

In 2021 (To Date), A Total of 222 All-Time Low Temperature Records Have Been
Broken In The United States, Versus Just The 7 For All-Time High
AlleyCat
2022-01-04 07:23:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Uhhh... What HAPPENED, Pussy-Boy? - Wind Power Drops By A Third In Quarter 3

Wind Power Drops By A Third In Q3

The latest energy trends data have been published by BEIS:

https://149366104.v2.pressablecdn.com/wp-
content/uploads/2022/01/image_thumb.png

It is quite shocking to see that wind generation has fallen by 38% for onshore
and 24% for offshore year on year. This is despite new capacity being added.
We are familiar with short term drops in output, maybe for a few days or even
weeks. But to lose effectively a third of generation for a whole quarter shows
just how dangerous over reliance on wind power is.
The difference was made up largely from imports, which doubled:

https://149366104.v2.pressablecdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/image_thumb-
1.png

How long we can count on that is anybody's guess.

Keep sucking that dick, pansy-boy.

Why so darn gay?

You mad, sis?

=====

The Reason Renewables Can't Power Modern Civilization Is Because They Were
Never Meant To

Over the last decade, journalists have held up Germany's renewables energy
transition, the Energiewende, as an environmental model for the world.

"Many poor countries, once intent on building coal-fired power plants to bring
electricity to their people, are discussing whether they might leapfrog the
fossil age and build clean grids from the outset," thanks to the Energiewende,
wrote a New York Times reporter in 2014.

With Germany as inspiration, the United Nations and World Bank poured billions
into renewables like wind, solar, and hydro in developing nations like Kenya.

But then, last year, Germany was forced to acknowledge that it had to delay its
phase-out of coal, and would not meet its 2020 greenhouse gas reduction
commitments. It announced plans to bulldoze an ancient church and forest in
order to get at the coal underneath it.

After renewables investors and advocates, including Al Gore and Greenpeace,
criticized Germany, journalists came to the country's defense. "Germany has
fallen short of its emission targets in part because its targets were so
ambitious," one of them argued last summer.

"If the rest of the world made just half Germany's effort, the future for our
planet would look less bleak," she wrote. "So Germany, don't give up. And also:
Thank you."

But Germany didn't just fall short of its climate targets. Its emissions have
flat-lined since 2009.

Now comes a major article in the country's largest newsweekly magazine, Der
Spiegel, titled, "A Botched Job in Germany" ("Murks in Germany"). The
magazine's cover shows broken wind turbines and incomplete electrical
transmission towers against a dark silhouette of Berlin.

"The Energiewende - the biggest political project since reunification -
threatens to fail," write Der Spiegel's Frank Dohmen, Alexander Jung, Stefan
Schultz, Gerald Traufetter in their a 5,700-word investigative story.

Over the past five years alone, the Energiewende has cost Germany Eu32 billion
($36 billion) annually, and opposition to renewables is growing in the German
countryside.

"The politicians fear citizen resistance" Der Spiegel reports. "There is hardly
a wind energy project that is not fought."

In response, politicians sometimes order "electrical lines be buried
underground but that is many times more expensive and takes years longer."

As a result, the deployment of renewables and related transmission lines is
slowing rapidly. Less than half as many wind turbines (743) were installed in
2018 as were installed in 2017, and just 30 kilometers of new transmission were
added in 2017.

Solar and wind advocates say cheaper solar panels and wind turbines will make
the future growth in renewables cheaper than past growth but there are reasons
to believe the opposite will be the case.
It will cost Germany $3-$4 trillion to increase renewables as share of
electricity from today's 35%... [+] to 100% between 2025-2050

It will cost Germany $3-$4 trillion to increase renewables as share of
electricity from today's 35%... [+] AG Energiebinlanzen

Der Spiegel cites a recent estimate that it would cost Germany "Eu3.4 trillion
($3.8 trillion)," or seven times more than it spent from 2000 to 2025, to
increase solar and wind three to five-fold by 2050.

Between 2000 and 2019, Germany grew renewables from 7% to 35% of its
electricity. And as much of Germany's renewable electricity comes from biomass,
which scientists view as polluting and environmentally degrading, as from
solar.

Of the 7,700 new kilometers of transmission lines needed, only 8% have been
built, while large-scale electricity storage remains inefficient and expensive.
"A large part of the energy used is lost," the reporters note of a much-hyped
hydrogen gas project, "and the efficiency is below 40%... No viable business
model can be developed from this."

Meanwhile, the 20-year subsidies granted to wind, solar, and biogas since 2000
will start coming to an end next year. "The wind power boom is over," Der
Spiegel concludes.

All of which raises a question: if renewables can't cheaply power Germany, one
of the richest and most technologically advanced countries in the world, how
could a developing nation like Kenya ever expect them to allow it to
"leapfrog" fossil fuels?

The Question of Technology

The earliest and most sophisticated 20th Century case for renewables came from
a German who is widely considered the most influential philosopher of the 20th
Century, Martin Heidegger.

In his 1954 essay, "The Question Concerning of Technology," Heidegger condemned
the view of nature as a mere resource for human consumption.

The use of "modern technology," he wrote, "puts to nature the unreasonable
demand that it supply energy which can be extracted and stored as such... Air
is now set upon to yield nitrogen, the earth to yield ore, ore to yield
uranium... to yield atomic energy."

The solution, Heidegger argued, was to yoke human society and its economy to
unreliable energy flows. He even condemned hydro-electric dams, for dominating
the natural environment, and praised windmills because they "do not unlock
energy in order to store it."

These weren't just aesthetic preferences. Windmills have traditionally been
useful to farmers whereas large dams have allowed poor agrarian societies to
industrialize.

In the US, Heidegger's views were picked up by renewable energy advocates.
Barry Commoner in 1969 argued that a transition to renewables was needed to
bring modern civilization "into harmony with the ecosphere."

The goal of renewables was to turn modern industrial societies back into
agrarian ones, argued Murray Bookchin in his 1962 book, Our Synthetic
Environment.

Bookchin admitted his proposal "conjures up an image of cultural isolation and
social stagnation, of a journey backward in history to the agrarian societies
of the medieval and ancient worlds."

But then, starting around the year 2000, renewables started to gain a high-tech
luster. Governments and private investors poured $2 trillion into solar and
wind and related infrastructure, creating the impression that renewables were
profitable aside from subsidies.

Entrepreneurs like Elon Musk proclaimed that a rich, high-energy civilization
could be powered by cheap solar panels and electric cars.

Journalists reported breathlessly on the cost declines in batteries, imagining
a tipping point at which conventional electricity utilities would be
"disrupted."

But no amount of marketing could change the poor physics of resource-intensive
and land-intensive renewables. Solar farms take 450 times more land than
nuclear plants, and wind farms take 700 times more land than natural gas wells,
to produce the same amount of energy.

Efforts to export the Energiewende to developing nations may prove even more
devastating.

The new wind farm in Kenya, inspired and financed by Germany and other well-
meaning Western nations, is located on a major flight path of migratory birds.
Scientists say it will kill hundreds of endangered eagles.

"It's one of the three worst sites for a wind farm that I've seen in Africa in
terms of its potential to kill threatened birds," a biologist explained.

In response, the wind farm's developers have done what Europeans have long done
in Africa, which is to hire the organizations, which ostensibly represent the
doomed eagles and communities, to collaborate rather than fight the project.

Kenya won't be able to "leapfrog" fossil fuels with its wind farm. On the
contrary, all of that unreliable wind energy is likely to increase the price of
electricity and make Kenya's slow climb out of poverty even slower.

Heidegger, like much of the conservation movement, would have hated what the
Energiewende has become: an excuse for the destruction of natural landscapes
and local communities.

Opposition to renewables comes from the country peoples that Heidegger idolized
as more authentic and "grounded" than urbane cosmopolitan elites who fetishize
their solar roofs and Teslas as signs of virtue.

Germans, who will have spent $580 billion on renewables and related
infrastructure by 2025, express great pride in the Energiewende. "It's our gift
to the world," a renewables advocate told The Times.

Tragically, many Germans appear to have believed that the billions they spent
on renewables would redeem them. "Germans would then at last feel that they
have gone from being world-destroyers in the 20th century to world-saviors in
the 21st," noted a reporter.

Many Germans will, like Der Spiegel, claim the renewables transition was merely
"botched," but it wasn't. The transition to renewables was doomed because
modern industrial people, no matter how Romantic they are, do not want to
return to pre-modern life.

============================================================================

The Global Average Temperature Dropped 0.29C Last Month - Now Sits At Just
0.08C Above The 30-Year Baseline

School Cancelled In Yakutia, Russia As Temperatures Plunge To -50C (-58F)

Record-Breaking Cold Continues To Grip Western Canada

"Red Alerts" Issued In India As Cold Wave Intensifies

Amid Freezing Lows & Energy Shortages, Europe Struggles To Keep The Lights On

Bhopal, India Suffers Lowest Temp In 55 Years

"Hazardous" Freeze To Hit The Prairies

Rare Polar Stratospheric Clouds Spotted

Europe Forecast A Bitterly Cold and Snowy Christmas

Colder Winter Headed For U.S. With Incoming 'Polar Vortex'

"Unprecedented" Cold Wave Is Hitting Scandinavia

Alaska Suffers "Persistent Record-Shattering Cold"

A Freezing Start To Winter Is "Rapidly Depleting" Europe's Gas Reserves

St. Petersburg's "Deep Freeze" Breaks 1893 Record

Sweden Busts All-Time December Low (-46.8F)

Bethel, Alaska Suffered Its Coldest November in 82 Years

Australia Suffered Coldest Nov Since 1999

Monthly Lows (And Rare Snows) Fall in Hawaii

Record Cold Grips Siberia (-68.3F)

Canada Sees Lowest November Temp Since 2004 (-45.6F)

Low Temperature Records Continue to Fall Across Europe

Australia's NSW Suffers Coldest November On Record

Record Lows Grip Europe

Sweden Registers -37.4C (-35.3F)

UK Schools Forced To Shut, + Bigger Freeze Inbound

Nordic Power Prices Surge On Sub-Zero Temps And Low Winds

Danger To Life' Warning Issued In Scotland

Spain Issues 'Cold Weather Alerts' - Restarts Old Coal Power Plant To Cope

In 2021 (To Date), A Total of 222 All-Time Low Temperature Records Have Been
Broken In The United States, Versus Just The 7 For All-Time High

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